With agriculture you can’t go wrong

RANCHI – For the past eleven days or so, I have been pondering about on how to employ myself, energy, skills and the little savings I have made over the years into one thing or another that can bring me great returns. Just like Ray Charles Robinson sung about Georgia On My Mind, for me, it has been Agriculture On My Mind.

The same issue was rejuvenated three days when I had a skype chat with my former OB (Old Boy) from primary school, Samuel Muyomba. During the chat, he informed me he bought 10 acres of land of which he has utilised 5 acres for agricultural production which has paid him off. The rest of it, he used it for animal husbandry.

I shared the same thoughts with my Ugandan colleague who works in Hazaribag one of the cities of the state of Jharkhand in India, still we rotated on the same thinking platform although he promised to help on something which is still in mind and between us.

Interestingly, I shared the same thoughts with a Kenyan colleague, Stephanie Zighe. We spoke at length and exchanged ideas but still we were snapping to same agricultural lyrics. She gave me a series of ideas that I got rooted into which I am ready to apply.

I am yet to share it with the love of my life and know her take on it. I believe in her mind and sense of direction. She will give me more details and ideas about planting profitable crops together with her mother.

Reading Prof. Gilbert Balibaseka Bukenya’s interview with Dorothy Nakaweesi of the Daily Monitor on February 21, 2013, his answers reawakened my mind again and that is the reason why I wrote this article for my blog. It left me with one opinion which is, after my contract has expired in India, am to travel back to the “Banana Republic” of Uganda or the Pearl of Africa and start circumnavigating on agriculture.

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Prof. Gilbert Bukenya on one of his farm. Photo courtesy of the Daily Monitor

Prof. Bukenya started by planting Nerica Upland rice in 2003 at one of his farms in Lwantama-Kakiri, Wakiso District for five years before he spread the idea to the rest of the country during his nation-wide campaigns. Upland rice received positive reception because it ensures food security and is a source of income to those who grow it. He says he got the idea while on trip to Cameroon.

Additionally, he says that he is into tropical apples, hibiscus, macadamia, dairy cattle farming, fish and poultry among others.. He elaborated more and said that according to research, each tropical apple tree, on average, bears 400 fruits and that Uganda has two seasons. This can double to 800 fruits in a year from one tree. He said that if an apple was sold at Ug.shs 200, in two seasons a farmer would be earning Ug.shs 160,000 from one tree in a year. How cool is that? He also said that a kilo of macadamia costs about USD 30 equivalent to Ug.shs 80,000. So would a farmer go wrong in agriculture? I guess not.

He cautioned the government he once served as a minister and later as the Vice President, that it should concentrate more and give priority to agriculture because it supports the economy. With the discovery of oil in the Albertine Graben, everybody is excited about it. He advised that the people of Uganda should not forget about agriculture. He gave an example of Nigeria as the leading importer of food in Africa because it has over relied on oil and forgotten about agriculture.

I wondered why the learned professor had not eschewed politics for developmental work maybe the timing had not yet arrived!!!

Prof. Bukenya is a Ugandan physician and politician who was once a Vice President of Uganda from 23 May 2003 until 23 May 2011. He also represents Busiro North constituency in the Ugandan 9th Parliament. He has been an MP since 1996.

Uganda is a fertile and landlocked country with a total population of about 35 million people. Majority of these are thought to be around 82% and live in rural areas who mainly rely on substance agriculture and of which, the rural setting contribute more food to the urban dwellers. Agriculture in Uganda has been and still it is the back bone of Uganda. Uganda has mainly been exporting to Southern Sudan and Kenya in the recent past.

Almost half of the rural population live in abject poverty without reliable supply of food despite the good fertile soils and favourable weather. This is because they produce less for consumption as more is sold off to earn a living. Many barriers to this can be traced to be among other, poor farming techniques, land fragmentation and high population pressure a small piece of land.

Many of those who have relatively bigger chunks of land use rudimentary methods leaving them with shorter hands to acquire the mechanisation means. Irrigation is also a problem in that they are a few farmers who apply that agricultural discipline or else they are in places where they are hardly any water source. Above all, most of them cannot access loans from the banks and some who can, the interest rate is high if not very. This means that agriculture still stands out although a lot is needed to be done in Uganda.

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wakojoel

I am a Mulamogi from Bulamogi sub-region in Kaliro district. Bulamogi was founded around 1550 by Zibondo Lamogi. When the British arrived in Uganda, they made Bulamogi a British protectorate in Busoga in 1896. Remember, Bulamogi was a chiefdom. I come from a long linage of Kisira Ladaaga Wambuzi Zibondo X who was the first chief appointed by the British under the Busoga Confederation at Bukaleba in present day Mayuge District. He was later succeeded by his son Ezekiel T. Waako Zibondo XI as the ruler of Busoga who held the 1st title of Kyabazinga wa Busoga literally meaning King of Busoga. Ezekiel T. Waako was succeeded by his son Henry Waako Muloki Zibondo XII (O.B.E) who ruled until his death and was succeeded by his son Edward C Wambuzi Zibondo XIII. My grandfather Waako Zephaniah Nabetta was a chief who had 168 children and 128 grandchildren by the time he died in 1972 way back before I was born. My father was a flight operator initially with East Africa. I am a Smooth Jazz fanatic and Formula One enthusiast. Anything else, find me at my own leisure time. God bless. Peace and love.

2 thoughts on “With agriculture you can’t go wrong”

  1. Hi, this is a very interesting article. Its cool you have a blog of your own and you can share with, as many people as you can. Hey if you have any savings, tree growing is as good too. I know Carol likes the coffee idea which is intact very good. Because of late coffee prices are going high and higher… Carol has already planted coffee of her own and she is on a coffee growing campaign for every family with land.
    Could you check on the latest issues on biotechnology and biosafety. Uganda is developing biotechnology and biosafety law and bill is already out for discussion before it will be table again by parliament. A lot of ideas are badly needed here.

    Like

    1. Thank you very much Madam Sarah. This is my blog and I share everything I write articles every week. You can check out the latest about Kenyan election outcomes as Uhuru was declared a winner in quotes. Well, I plan to plant trees as well and also coffee. I have quite a bigger land in the village and I am sure I will utilise it well.

      I will check about Biotechnology and Bio-safety. I need to read about them extensively and come up with a conclusive and decisive work on. I need to have a great and firm base. I will share with I think in a weeks time on the outcomes.

      Like

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